Introduce Author In Essay

The worst author introduction I ever saw is making me cringe, right now, as I remember it. The co-owner of the bookstore started by reading through the store’s upcoming events flier, pausing to extemporize on each event. This took a full 10 minutes. Then she spent 5 minutes talking about the plight of independent bookstores, and how they need money to do things like community book nights, and hey she’s got this newsletter sign-up sheet that she’s going to pass around. And while we’re at it, the store actually has two different email newsletters that they send out, and she described them both in great detail. Another sign-up sheet is passed around.

Having already wasted close to 20 minutes of our time, she launched into a synopsis of the book, interspersed with her own impressions, leaving no secondary character or minor scene unnamed. Worst of all, the book has a rather large twist in the second half, and she was explicitly hinting at what it is. Someone in the audience actually yelled out, “Don’t give it away!” This was advice she did not take.

This is an extreme example, by far the worst I’ve ever seen, but author introduction crimes are rampant. I was recently at a literary festival where at least 10 of the roughly 15 author introductions I saw were painful to sit through. I take this issue seriously because I was an author events coordinator at Brookline Booksmith for two years, and we took pride in our author introductions. The willingness and ability to carefully craft a good author introduction, in fact, was part of my job interview.

Author introductions, in my opinion, are about courtesy. Should a beloved, Pulitzer Prize-winning author have to hear the president of Northwestern’s Jewish students’ society call him Michael Sha-BONE eight times in two minutes? No. Because he flew across the country to speak for 50 minutes in your overheated auditorium and you have the internet. A good author introduction shows the author that you’re excited to be a partner in promoting their work and that you value the role their career plays on the literary stage, all while being informative and – lord have mercy – brief.

How To Introduce an Author

Step 1. Find Out Who the Author Is

Get your details straight. Look up the pronunciation of their name, even if you think you know it. If a definitive answer is elusive, ask their publicist, agent, or whoever set up the event with you. Otherwise, ask the author when they arrive, before you hit the microphone with some garbled version of Eugenides.

Find out what books they’ve written. Don’t say that Stay Awake is Dan Chaon’s fifth novel. He’s written two novels, but this is his third story collection. Do you think A History of Love is Nicole Krauss’s first book? Wrong! Look it up. If you find yourself introducing someone like Michael Chabon, who’s written novels, short stories, essays, comic books, and children’s books, just avoid taxonomy and say he’s prolific.

Find out what awards they’ve won, where they teach (currently), and what periodicals they write for. More on this later.

If you haven’t had time to do your research, don’t guess, and definitely don’t — as I saw someone do last weekend — turn to Kevin Brockmeier in the middle of your introduction and say “Is The View From the Seventh Layer a novel?” I shudder.

Step 2. Weed Out Unnecessary/Unimpressive Details

So you’ve printed out the author’s Wikipedia entry. Don’t include the fact that they teach creative writing part-time at Eastern Nevada State. Don’t mention that they won the Central North Carolina Writer’s Prize. Don’t say that they were included on Entertainment Weekly’s 100 Authors to Watch list.

These details do two things — they make the author look small-time, and they give the impression that you’re desperate for any scrap of information to fill out your introduction.

Which Brings Us to Step 3. Include Personal Impressions

Personal impressions of the author’s work should be the bulk of your introduction. Ideally, they will be your personal impressions. During my first year as an events coordinator, I read each author’s book before I hosted their event, a debatably unnecessary gesture with enormous dividends.

Firstly, it is yet another step you can take to avoid looking like an idiot. The room is full of people who’ve most likely come to hear the author because they’ve read their work. It’s embarrassing when the person at the microphone is the only one who hasn’t.

Secondly, it will endear you greatly to the author. Consult any number of essays written by authors on the drudgery of the book tour, and you’ll know that being greeted by someone who’s taken the time to prepare for their visit is a rare and lovely thing.

Thirdly, nothing is more compelling than sincerity. Speaking thoughtfully and graciously about your reading experience will get the whole room, including the author, excited about the event far more than a list of writing prizes they’ve won, or periodicals they’ve contributed to. Listening to someone introduce one of their favorite authors can be really beautiful.

I spent two days writing an introduction for Jonathan Safran Foer. I read Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close and I reread Everything is Illuminated. I quoted both books. I talked about his critical reputation and my own love for his work both as a reader and as a bookseller. After the event he asked me if I would sign my printed out copy of the introduction for him to keep. I’m sure he doesn’t have it anymore, but it was absolutely the best moment of my nine-year bookselling career.

That introduction, by the way, was 235 words long.

So Obviously Step 4 is Wrap It Up

500 words maximum. Absolutely no more than 500 words. 200-300 words is ideal, but 500 words is the limit. No exceptions, friends, 500 words.

Do your homework. Communicate enthusiasm. Get out of the way.

Caveats on Introducing a Famous Author

If you’re in a theater with a few hundred people, you don’t need to convince anybody that the author you’re introducing is impressive. They know that, that’s why they’re in a theatre. Stick to two or three of the most impressive details. “Marilynne Robinson is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author who teaches at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop” does the trick as far as eminence goes. A long, long list of accomplishments isn’t impressive, it’s tiresome. Jennifer Egan was included in Best American Short Stories? No kidding. She’s Jennifer Egan.

Unless it’s short, pithy, and you’re working it into one of your sentences, you don’t need to quote a famous author’s reviewers. The New York Times thinks Richard Ford is a great writer? No kidding. He’s Richard Ford.

Caveats on Introducing a New/Not Famous Author

Please read the book. To avoid filling the introduction with the only vaguely impressive accolades we talked about earlier, read the book and say something nice about it.

In this case, it is great to quote reviewers. Not everyone gets to teach at Iowa, but a lot more people get reviewed by a major newspaper. Quoting these reviews puts the author in the big leagues. If you find a great review of the book, but it’s not in a well-known publication, just attribute it to “one reviewer,” not “a reviewer in the Tuscaloosa Daily Press.”

Miscellaneous Tips

Don’t list everything the author has ever written. Five titles maximum, or one or two from a few different genres.

Don’t synopsize anything but the book the author is currently promoting.

Any synopsis you do give of the current book should be one sentence long.

Don’t pretend like you have plans to read the author. Comments like “I can’t wait to get my hands on this book” or “A Thousand Acres has been on my to-be-read pile for a long time” are condescending and blatantly untrue. If you were going to read the book, you would have done it.

Do quote the author in the introduction.

Do get housekeeping details — where the signing line will be, where to buy the books — out of the way before you start your introduction.

If you’re introducing a joint reading or a panel, don’t make one author sound more impressive than the others.

Print out your introduction (you’ve worked so hard!), practice reading it out loud before the event, and don’t go off script.

 

Image via Wikimedia Commons

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Janet Potter is a staff writer for The Millions. Janet is a freelance writer and semi-professional baker living in Chicago. Her writing has appeared in The Awl, The AV Club, the Chicago Reader, and Chicago Magazine. She is the co-host of YouTube's The Book Report and blogs about presidential biographies at At Times Dull. Follow her @sojanetpotter.

Remember that you are required to cite your sources for paraphrases and direct quotes. For more information on MLA Style, APA style, Chicago Style, ASA Style, CSE Style, and I-Search Format, refer to our Gallaudet TIP Citations and Referenceslink.

Words that introduce Quotes or Paraphrases are basically three keys verbs:

  • Neutral Verbs(here)
  • Stronger Verbs(here)
  • Inference Verbs(here)

Neutral Verbs: When used to introduce a quote, the following verbs basically mean "says"

Examples of Neutral Verbs

The authorsays. The authornotes. The authorbelieves. The authorobserves. The authorcomments. The authorrelates. The authordeclares. The authorremarks. The authordiscusses. The authorreports. The authorexplains. The authorreveals. The authorexpresses. The authorstates. The authormentions. The authoracknowledges. The authorsuggests. The authorthinks. The authorpoints out. The authorresponds. The authorshows. The authorconfirms.

Sample Sentences

MLA Style

    • Dr. Billowsaysthat being exposed to television violence at a young age desensitizes children to violence in real life (author's last name p.##).
    • As the authornotes, "In an ideal classroom, both gifted children and learning disabled children should feel challenged" (p.##).
    • Burdowbelievesthat being able to write using proper English grammar is an important skill (author's last name p.##).
    • Dr. Patelobservesthat "most people tend to respond well to hypnotherapy" (p. ##).
    • We see this self doubt again in the second scene, when Agatha comments, "Oh, times like this I just don't know whether I am right or wrong, good or bad" (p. ##).
    • Goeff then relatesthat his childhood was "the time he learned to live on less than bread alone" (p. ##).
    • The author declares, "All people, rich or poor, should pay the same taxes to the government" (p. ##).
    • Godfried remarks, "Ignorance is a skill learned by many of the greatest fools" (author's last name p.##).
    • The article discusses the qualities of a good American housewife in the 1950s (author's last name p.##).
    • After the war is over, the General reports that "It seemed a useless battle to fight even from the start" (p.##).
    • Danelli explains, "All mammals have hair" (p.##).

APA Style

      • The author reveals his true feelings with his ironic remark that we should "just resort to cannibalism to defeat world hunger" (p. ##).
      • Forton expresses disapproval of the American welfare system (author's last name, year, p. ##).
      • The author states that "More than fifty percent of all marriages end in divorce" (p. ##).
      • He also mentions, "Many children grow up feeling responsible for their parents' mistakes" (p. ##).
      • Jones acknowledges that although the divorce rate is increasing, most young children still dream of getting married (author's last name, year, p. ##).
      • The author suggests that we hone our English skills before venturing into the work force (author's last name, year, p. ##).
      • The author thinks that the recent weather has been too hot (author's last name, year, p. ##).
      • Folsh points out that there were hundreds of people from varying backgrounds at the convention (author's last name, year, p. ##).
      • Julia Hertz responded to allegations that her company was aware of the faulty tires on their cars (author's last name, year, p. ##).
      • His research shows that 7% of Americans suffer from Social Anxiety Disorder (author's last name, year, p. ##).
      • Jostin's research confirmed his earlier hypothesis: mice really are smarter than rats (author's last, year, name p. ##).

Stronger Verbs: These verbs indicate that there is some kind of argument, and that the quote shows either support of or disagreement with one side of the argument.

Examples of Stronger Verbs

The author agrees . . .The author rejects. The author argues. The author compares. (the two studies)The author asserts.The author admits.The author cautions.The author disputes. The author emphasizes. The author contends. The author insists. The author denies. The author maintains. The author refutes. The author claims. The author endorses.

Sample Sentences

MLA Style

        • Despite criticism, Johnston agrees that smoking should be banned in all public places (author's last name p.##).
        • The author argues that "subjecting non-smokers to toxic second-hand smoke is not only unfair, but a violation of their right to a safe environment" (p.##).
        • Vick asserts that "cigarette smoke is unpleasant, and dangerous" (p.##).
        • The author cautions that "people who subject themselves to smoky bars night after night could develop illnesses such as emphysema or lung cancer" (p.##).
        • Rosentrhaw emphasizes that "second-hand smoke can kill" (p.##).
        • Still, tobacco company executives insist that they "were not fully aware of the long term damages caused by smoking" when they launched their nationwide advertising campaign (author's last name p.##).
        • Though bar owners disagree, Johnston maintains that banning smoking in all public places will not negatively affect bar business (author's last name p.##).
        • Jefferson claims that banning smoking in public places will hurt America's economy (author's last name p.##).

APA Style

        • Johnson refutes allegations that his personal finances have been in trouble for the past five years (author's last name, year, p. ##).
        • Whiley rejects the idea that the earth could have been formed by a massive explosion in space (author's last name, year, p. ##).
        • Lucci compares the house prices in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia (author's last name, year, p. ##).
        • Although they have stopped short of admitting that smoking causes cancer in humans, tobacco companies have admitted that "smoking causes cancer in laboratory rats" (p. ##).
        • For years, local residents have been disputing the plans to build a new highway right through the center of town (author's last name, year, p. ##).
        • Residents contend that the new highway will lower property values (author's last name, year, p. ##).
        • The Department of Transportation denies claims that the new bridge will damage the fragile ecosystem of the Potomac River (author's last name, year, p. ##).
        • Joley endorses the bridge, saying "our goal is to make this city more accessible to those who live outside of it" (p. ##).

Inference Verbs: These verbs indicate that there is some kind of argument, and that the quote shows either support of or disagreement with one side of the argument.

Examples of Inference Verbs

The author implies.The author suggests.The author thinks.

Sample Sentences

MLA Style

        • By calling them ignorant, the author implies that they were unschooled and narrow minded (author's last name p.##).
        • Her preoccupation with her looks suggests that she is too superficial to make her a believable character (author's last name p.##).
        • Based on his research, we can assume Hatfield thinks that our treatment of our environment has been careless (author's last name p.##).

One phrase that is often used to introduce a quotation is:

According to the author, . . .

      • According to the author, children with ADD have a shorter attention span than children without ADD (author's last name, year, p. ##).

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